Friday, March 24, 2017

The Girl on the Train by Paula Hawkins

Started 3/16/17
Finished: 3/20/17
Year: 2015
Pages: 323
Genre: Thriller
Grade: B+
Reason for reading: bookray on Bookcrossing.com
Blurb (from book jacket): "Rachel takes the same commuter train every morning and night. Every day she rattles down the track, flashes past a stretch of cozy suburban homes, and stops at the signal that allows her to daily watch the same couple breakfasting on their deck. She looks forward to it. She's even started to feel like she knows them. Jess and Jason, she calls them. Their life-as she sees it-is perfect. Not unlike the life she recently lost.
"And then she sees something shocking. It's only a minute until the train moves on, but it's enough. Now everything's changed. Unable to keep it to herself, Rachel goes to the police. But is she really as unreliable as they say? Soon she is deeply entangled not only in the investigation but in the loves of everyone involved. Has she done more harm than good?"
Opinion: My fiance and I had seen the movie first and thought that it was really good. I had been wanting to read the book for a while and got my change. The book is better than the movie and the movie did follow the book pretty well. Definitely some good suspense and a good thriller.

Friday, March 17, 2017

Long Black Veil by Jennifer Finney Boylan

Started: 3/3/17
Finished: 3/13/17
Year: 2017
Pages: 292
Genre: mystery
Grade: B-
Reason for reading: review for LibraryThing.com
Blurb (from back cover): "On a warm August night in 1980, six college students are up to no good inside the dilapidated ruins of Philadelphia's Eastern State Penitentiary. It's not long before they realize they are locked in and not alone, and the terrible night ends in tragedy. Years later, one of them-celebrity chef Jon Casey-will finally be charged with murder, but will Jon's old friend Judith Carrigan testify to his innocence? Judith is protecting long-held and hard-won secrets of her own, and to defend her friend, she risks sacrificing the life she has fought to build and losing her husband and son. In any life that contains a before and an after, how is it possible to be one person, not two?"
Opinion: Each chapter is taken from a different character's point of view and it was confusing at times to figure out who was talking. There really is no trial for Casey so the blurb is misleading. There are two stories in one-the murder and then who Judith really is. Judith's story should be one of its own and not included in this book

Thursday, March 02, 2017

Bone Box by Faye Kellerman

Started 2/13/17
Finished 3/2/17
Year: 2017
Pages:  414
Genre: Mystery
Grade: C
Reason for reading: review for MyShelf
Blurb (from book jacket): "On a bright and crisp September morning, while walking a bucolic woodland trail, Rina stumbles upon human remains once buried deep beneath the forest floor. Immediately, she calls her husband, Peter Decker, a former detective lieutenant with the LAPD now working for the local Greenbury Police. Within hours, a vista of beauty and tranquility is transformed into a frenetic crime scene. The body has been interred for years and there is scant physical evidence at the gravesite: a youthful skeleton, a skull wound, and long, dark strands of hair surrounding the bones. As Decker and his partner, Tyler McAdams, investigate further, they realize that they're most likely dealing with a missing student from the nearby Five Colleges of Upstate-a well-know and well-respected consortium of higher learning where Rina works.
"And when more human remains are found in the same area, Decker and McAdams know this isn't just a one-off murder case. Short-staffed and with no convenient entree into the colleges, Decker enlists Rina's help to act as his eyes and ears on campus. Winding their way through a dangerous labyrinth of steely suspects and untouchable academics, Decker, McAdams, and Rina race to protect their community from a psychopathic killer still in the area-and on the hunt for a fresh victim.
Opinion: There seemed to be a lot of filler in this book. Lots of meaningless conversation that did not add to the mystery. And for that, I was disappointed. I've read other books by her and don't remember them to be so much filler. The mystery itself was interesting and had enough twists to keep me guessing.

Monday, January 30, 2017

Ghosts Among Us by Leslie Rule

Started: 1/26/17
Finished: 1/30/17
Year: 2004
Pages: 222
Genre: Paranormal
Grade: B+
Reason for reading: TBR pile
Blurb (from back cover): "Whether you are a believer or a skeptic, the stories of the supernatural in Ghosts Among Us: True Stories of Spirit Encounters will keep you riveted. Macabre and fascinating, Leslie Rule's latest book offers true-life haunting accounts of eerie visitations and paranormal experiences along with artistically shot black-and-white photographs of haunted sites. The personal firsthand reports and chilling full-length stories explore mysterious events across the country-from Nantucket Island to San Antonio to Hollywood-events that the reader will find hard to pass off as mere coincidences.
Opinion: I'm a believer in ghosts as energy just doesn't stop. Some of the first hand stories are more interesting than others. There were several that I wanted to know more about-history of the places, what else has happened to people, etc.

Saturday, January 28, 2017

The Complete Tales and Poems by Edgar Allen Poe

Started: 1/17/16
Finished: DNF
Genre: horror/literature
Grade: no grade
Opinion: I didn't finish this because I was not in the mood. I had read several of his stories and poems in school and on my own years before. Some of the new to me stuff was much more historical in nature. I am still a fan of his but just couldn't get into the stories for some reason.

Tuesday, January 17, 2017

Moloka'i by Alan Brennert

Started: 1/6/17
Finished: 1/16/17
Year: 2003
Pages: 384
Genre: fiction
Grade: B+
Reason for reading: grabbed off TBR pile
Blurb (from back cover): "This richly imagined novel, set in Hawaii'i more than a century ago, is an extraordinary epic of a little-known time and place-and a deeply moving testament to the resiliency of the human spirit.
"Rachel Kalama, a spirited seven-year-old Hawaiian girl, dreams of visiting far-off lands like her father, a merchant seaman. Then one day a rose-colored mark appears on her skin, and those dreams are stolen from her. Taken from her home and family, Rachel is sent to Kalaupapa, the quarantined leprosy settlement on the island of Moloka'i. Here her life is supposed to end-but instead she discovers it is only just beginning."
Blurb: I had heard a lot about this book and finally managed to get a copy and read it. Definitely some heartfelt moments and characters that will stick with me for a while.

Tuesday, January 03, 2017

Daddy King: An autobiography by The Reverend Martin Luther King, Sr.

Started: 12/29/16
Finished: 1/3/17
Year: 1980 (this edition 2017)
Pages: 202
Genre: Autobiography
Grade: B
Reason for reading: review for Librarything.com
Blurb (from back cover): "Born in 1899 to a family of sharecroppers in Stockbridge, Georgia, Martin Luther King, Sr., came of age under the looming threat of violence at the hands of white landowners. Growing up, he witnessed his family being crushed by the wight of poverty and racism, and escaped to Atlanta to answer the calling to become a preacher. before engaging in acts of political dissent or preaching at Ebenezer Baptist Church, where he would remain for more than four decades, King, Sr., earned high school and college diplomas while working double shifts as a truck driver-and he won the heart of his future wife, Alberta 'Bunch' Williams.
"King, Sr., recalls the struggles and joys of his journey: the pain of leaving his parents and seven siblings on the family farm; the triumph of winning voting rights for black in Atlanta; and the feelings of fatherly pride and anxiety as he watched his son put his life in danger at the forefront of the civil rights movement. Originally published in 1980, Daddy King is an unexpected and poignant memoir."
Opinion: Growing up, I always was aware of Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. and his fight for Civil Rights. I found it interesting how much his father did before he continued the movement. I hadn't realized the deep history of the movement and how it influenced the generations to come. A great story to tell and to have heard.